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Popular malls in Metro Manila that were actually cemeteries before!



Would you believe that some popular malls and other commercial spaces nowadays are actually cemeteries before? Here is the list of some popular places or malls in Metro Manila which were actually cemeteries several years or decades ago.

STAR MALL ALABANG


Starmall Alabang is located in Alabang, Muntinlupa City. It is one of the nine Starmall locations here in the country. But most of us didn’t know that the five-storey shopping mall in Muntinlupa stands on the Alabang Cemetery. It is actually built in the 1990s. The Starmall brand is a chain of shopping malls developed and operated by Starmalls Inc., it is a subsidiary of former Senate president and Filipino businessman Manuel Villar’s listed property holding firm Vista Malls and Lifescapes Inc. He is the country’s second-richest man in 2018 with an estimated net worth of $5 billion, according to US magazine Forbes.



PLAZA CRISTO REY


The Plaza Cristo Rey is located in Poblacion, Makati City. It has been popular because it actually became a hangout place for hip and cool youngsters. Even though it already has a lot of restaurants, pubs, and nightclubs, the place was located on what used to be a “San Pedro de Makati Cemetery”.

HARRISON PLAZA


Harrison Plaza in Malate, Manila is one of the country’s first commercial shopping malls back in 1976. It was actually constructed on a former burial ground. There was also an “Ermita cemetery” located in the Fort de San Antonio Abad according to some reports.

REMEDIOS CIRCLE




The Remedios Circle in Malate, Manila used to be the former Malate Cemetery. According to some reports, the original Remedios Circle was ruined in World War II, during which the human remains were transferred to the Manila South Cemetery and today it now has many restaurants and other commercial establishments.

PACO PARK


The Paco Park in Paco, Manila is similar to the Remedios Circle. The round-shaped public park in San Marcelino St. was also a former burial site. According to Penelope Belmonte, the executive director of the National Parks Development Committee, said that what sets it apart is that the deceased buried in the old Paco Cemetery all came from well-off and prominent families.